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23 Destinations Open to American Tourists

Published on 7 July 2020

Countries are slowly reopening to international visitors. Each country’s reopening plan varies, and some destinations have limited where visitors can travel from.
With the US’ high coronavirus numbers, many countries have continued to restrict American travelers. However, other countries have announced that US citizens are welcome to visit and vacation.

Each country has outlined a plan to reopen, and it often requires visitors to bring a negative COVID-19 test upon arrival. Some countries are requiring visitors to have medical insurance and complete online health questionnaires.
It’s important that travelers research the destination before visiting and understand how their trip might be different.

Packing for a trip looks different today. Face masks, hand sanitizers, and gloves fill carry-on bags. A negative COVID-19 test may also be on your packing list.

As countries begin to reopen to international tourists, destinations are implementing different regulations and requirements in order to welcome visitors. Some destinations, like St. Lucia and Bermuda, require travelers to have a negative COVID-19 test before boarding a flight. Other places will require visitors to have travel insurance.

It’s imperative that people planning to travel research the destination they plan to visit. These rules are constantly changing and are designed to keep travelers and the country’s residents safe.

Here are some of the first destinations to welcome back tourists living in the US.

Editor’s note: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends avoiding all nonessential international travel during this time. If you decide to travel, follow the CDC’s recommendations in the Global COVID-19 Pandemic Notice.

The United Kingdom never officially closed its borders, but visitors from the US will be required to quarantine for 14 days.

If you’re willing to hunker down for 14 days, Americans can visit England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

A mandatory quarantine was put in place on June 8; however, the country recently announced that the quarantine is lifted for dozens of countries starting July 10.

The US did not make the list. Instead, it’s on the UK’s “red list,” which are countries the UK government deemed unsafe for travel.

Americans should still expect to quarantine for 14 days if traveling to the UK and fines can be issued if visitors do not self-isolate. Travelers must complete a Public Health Locator Form and provide UK officials with proof of accommodation.

At the time of writing, the UK had 286,938 confirmed cases and 44,305 coronavirus-related deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.

Serbia was one of the first countries to welcome American visitors in May.

According to the US embassy in Serbia, all coronavirus-related entry restrictions for both Serbian citizens and foreign visitors were lifted on May 22. At the time of writing, international visitors do not need to bring a negative COVID-19 test and no quarantine will be necessary upon entering the country.

However, the government of Serbia said this could change at any point, and US citizens should monitor the embassy’s website for updates related to COVID-19.

Serbia saw 16,420 coronavirus cases and 317 related deaths at the time of writing, per Johns Hopkins.

Tanzania reopened its borders to visitors on June 1.

The Government of Tanzania lifted its border restrictions and reopened its airports for international travel on June 1.

On the plane ride over, visitors will fill out a Health Surveillance Form and submit them to Port Health authorities. According to the US embassy in Tanzania, all travelers will be subjected to intensive screenings and, if necessary, COVID-19 rapid testing upon arrival.

Tanzania has recorded 509 coronavirus cases and 21 coronavirus-related deaths, per Johns Hopkins. The US embassy notes on its website that the Tanzanian government has not released numbers on COVID-19 cases and related deaths since April 29, and the risk of contracting the virus “remains high.”

The US Virgin Islands welcomed tourists on June 1.

Tourists could start planning their trip to the group of islands in the Caribbean starting June 1.

The islands’ airport never officially closed, but it was only used for essential travel. Now, it’s open to a range of travelers. Visitors are required to pass a health screening and temperature check upon arrival.

Once on the island, tourists will be required to wear a mask in public spaces, and gatherings are limited to 10 people.

The islands had 111 confirmed cases and six coronavirus-related deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.

As early as June 4, Americans could visit St. Lucia.

The island closed its borders to travelers on March 23 and officially reopened them on June 4.

Travelers must provide a negative COVID-19 test within seven days of boarding their flight. Once in the country, they’ll go through temperature checks and are required to wear a face mask in public spaces, according to the St. Lucia Tourism Authority.

St. Lucia saw 22 confirmed cases and zero coronavirus deaths at the time of writing, according to Johns Hopkins.

Antigua and Barbuda also opened its doors to tourists on June 4.

The Minister of Tourism announced a set of protocols for incoming visitors. Travelers flying by air are required to bring a negative COVID-19 test that was taken within seven days of their flights. If arriving via ship, visitors are subject to quarantine.

Once you reach the island, visitors can expect a series of health checks and assessments. Visitors may be required to take another coronavirus test upon arrival to their hotel or accommodations.

Antigua and Barbuda had a recorded 68 coronavirus cases and three deaths at the time of writing, per Johns Hopkins.

Starting on June 11, visitors traveling to Cambodia are required to pay a $3,000 deposit.

The Ministry of Health announced a required deposit upon arrival for tourists visiting Cambodia. Reuters
Although Cambodia’s borders have been open since May, the country’s Ministry of Health recently implemented a $3,000 deposit upon arrival. The money is designed to cover the costs if a traveler contracts the coronavirus during their visit.

Upon arrival, travelers will complete a mandatory COVID-19 test and show proof of health insurance, according to the US embassy in Cambodia.

At the time of writing, Cambodia has 141 confirmed coronavirus cases and zero deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.

Jamaica has been welcoming American visitors since mid-June.

In order to visit, travelers will need to complete the Travel Authorization prior to check-in for a flight to Jamaica, according to the official tourism site. This online application assesses the health risk of visitors.

The country is controlling entry, and passengers from “high-risk countries” will be required to take a COVID-19 test. The Jamaica Tourist Board deems travelers “high risk” if they’re traveling from, or through countries where there is high community transmission, according to its website.

The country is reopening in phases, starting with its “Resilient Corridor.” The entire country will not be opened to visitors. Instead, the main thoroughfare from Negril along the north coast to Port Antonio is currently open for travelers.

At the time of writing, Jamaica had 732 confirmed coronavirus cases and 10 coronavirus-related deaths, per Johns Hopkins.

Saint Barthélemy in the Caribbean welcomed visitors starting in late June.

St. Barts, a French-speaking Caribbean Island, opened its borders up to international travelers on June 22, according to CNN.

Visitors can either bring a negative coronavirus test taken within 72 hours of their flight or they can be tested upon arrival and quarantine for 24 hours until the test results come back.

Depending on the length of your trip, you may be required to get tested again. Currently, another test is required on day seven of a trip.

At the time of writing, St. Barts had six confirmed cases and zero deaths, according to Johns Hopkins.

Travelers can escape to the Bahamas starting in July.

People interested in traveling to the Bahamas will need to bring a negative coronavirus test and complete an online Health Visa, according to the official tourism site.

The Caribbean country reopened to private yachts, boaters, and airplanes starting on June 15, but as of July 1, anyone can visit. However, visitors will be required to follow the country’s curfew, which lasts from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. daily.

According to Johns Hopkins, the Bahamas had 104 confirmed cases and 11 coronavirus-related deaths at the time of writing.

The Dominican Republic entered phase four of reopening on July 1, and Americans are welcome to visit.

The Dominican Tree House Village in the Dominican Republic. Cam Greene
During phase four, borders will reopen to international visitors, according to the official tourism site for the Dominican Republic.

The country has not outlined any requirements for visitors to enter on its official website. However, Lucien Echavarria, director at the Ministry of Tourism of the Dominican Republic, previously told the Caribbean Journal that all airports will be open July 1 and about half of the island’s hotels will reopen. Echavarria said guests should expect temperature checks and other safety precautions at the airport.

At the time of writing, the Dominican Republic saw 37,425 cases of COVID-19 and 794 related deaths, per Johns Hopkins.

St. Martin began welcoming US tourists on July 1.

St. Martin is welcoming visitors back to its island. In the country’s checklist before arriving, visitors are required to complete a health declaration, bring a negative COVID-19 test result, and travel wearing a mask.

Spirit, JetBlue, and American plan to resume flights to St. Martin this month.

The island saw 78 confirmed coronavirus cases and 15 deaths at the time of writing, per Johns Hopkins.

Some seaside Egyptian resorts will open for international tourists on July 1.

A select number of seaside resorts in areas of Egypt that saw fewer cases of the coronavirus will open starting on July 1, according to Reuters.

The southern part of the Sinai Peninsula, the Red Sea resort areas, and Marsa Matrouh are scheduled to open. Other international flights, including those to the Cairo airport, are still suspended.

Egypt had 75,253 confirmed cases and 3,343 coronavirus-related deaths at the time of writing, according to Johns Hopkins.

Americans willing to take multiple coronavirus tests can visit Bermuda starting July 1.

Before stepping onto a flight to Bermuda, passengers must have a negative COVID test and travel insurance, according to a press release from the Bermuda travel authority. Once they reach the airport, they’ll take a second test and will be required to isolate on the property of their accommodations until results are ready. According to the press release, the turnaround time is between four and eight hours for flight passengers that arrive during the day.

Additionally, within 48 hours of arrival, travelers will need to complete an online travel authorization process, which costs $75.

Throughout a visitor’s vacation, they’ll also be asked to complete additional tests on day three, day seven, and day 14 of their stay, as well as take their temperature twice per day and report it via an online portal.

Bermuda saw 146 coronavirus cases and nine related deaths at the time of writing, according to Johns Hopkins.

Dubai will reopen to international tourists on July 7.

The United Arab Emirates announced its popular destination, Dubai, will reopen its borders starting July 7.

Incoming visitors will be required to fill out the typical visa application, have medical insurance, and download the COVID-19 DXB app prior to arrival. They’ll also need to bring a negative coronavirus test, complete a health declaration form, and go through temperature checks at the airport.

All requirements can be found on the Visit Dubai website.

According to Johns Hopkins, the United Arab Emirates saw 51,540 confirmed coronavirus cases and 323 deaths at the time of writing.

Aruba plans to open its borders to Americans on July 10.

The Government of Aruba and the Department of Public Health recently announced its reopening plans, and US citizens will be welcomed to the country starting July 10.

Before visiting, travelers will be required to complete the Embarkation/Disembarkation card process online and obtain Aruba Visitors Insurance. Visitors are encouraged to take a COVID-19 test before traveling to Aruba and present proof of negative results upon landing. However, travelers also have the option to pre-pay $75 for a mandatory test upon arrival, but they will be required to quarantine while test results are assessed.

When entering, travelers will be greeted with open salons, movie theaters, shopping malls, and both indoor and outdoor restaurants, which began reopening at the end of May.

The country recommends checking its official tourism site frequently for updates related to COVID-19.

According to Johns Hopkins, the country saw 105 coronavirus cases and three confirmed deaths as of June 30.

Starting on July 15, anyone can visit the Maldives with no restrictions.

The Maldives’ ambitious plan to reopen includes few restrictions. Tourists will not be required to quarantine or bring a negative COVID-19 test, unlike many other countries reopening to tourists, according to CNN.

However, travelers will be required to show a booking confirmation and can only stay at one resort for the duration of their trip.

The country has created a “Safe Tourism License” for facilities that follow government safety and sanitary regulations. The Ministry of Tourism’s guide for restarting tourism in the Maldives is 27 pages long.

The island country had a total of 2,468 confirmed coronavirus cases and 11 deaths at the time of writing, per Johns Hopkins.

Puerto Rico has also slated its reopening for July 15.

Similar to many other countries, Puerto Rico is requiring visitors to bring a negative coronavirus test upon arrival. Without a prior test, travelers will be required to take one at the airport and enter a 14-day quarantine. Travelers are also required to wear a face mask and complete a travel declaration form.

Once on the island, they’ll find many activities open but with limited capacity. Restaurants, spas, museums, theaters, and casinos are open at a 75% capacity, according to Discover Puerto Rico.

The US territory saw 7,916 coronavirus cases and 155 confirmed deaths at the time of writing, according to Johns Hopkins.

A trip to Mexico could happen for Americans after July 21.

Mexico and the US entered a joint agreement to restrict nonessential travel between the countries until July 21, according to the US embassy in Mexico.

After that, borders may reopen to visitors. It’s important to note that the restriction has been extended two times already, so visiting Mexico in late July or early August can’t be guaranteed.

Mexico saw 256,848 coronavirus cases and 30,639 related deaths at the time of writing, per Johns Hopkins.

Visitors can travel to Turks and Caicos starting July 22.

Visitors will need to bring proof of a negative COVID-19 test and medical insurance upon arrival, according to the Turks and Caicos Tourism Board. Face masks will also be mandatory in public spaces.

The British Overseas Territory had 48 coronavirus cases and two coronavirus-related death at the time of writing, according to Johns Hopkins.

Commercial flights to Barbados will resume July 25.

While international travel to Barbados will resume July 12, the first commercial flights will leave the US on July 25.

JetBlue will resume flights on the 25, and American Airlines will follow shortly on August 5, according to the US embassy in Barbados.

US citizens will be required to bring a negative COVID-19 test that was taken within 72 hours of the visitor’s flight. Visitors will also fill out an Embarkation/Disembarkation Card, which asks certain health and medical questions.

A majority of the island has reopened, and social gatherings of up to 500 will be allowed starting July 1.

Barbados saw a total of 98 confirmed coronavirus cases and seven coronavirus-related deaths at the time of writing, according to Johns Hopkins.

A trip to Sri Lanka will be possible starting August 1, but travelers should expect multiple COVID-19 tests.

Sri Lanka’s plan to reopen involves consistent testing throughout a visitor’s trip. Travelers will be asked to bring a negative COVID-19 test within 72 hours upon arrival. Once you reach the airport, you’ll be asked to take another test and quarantine until the results come back, which typically takes 24 hours.

Travelers will also be required to take another test on the fourth or fifth day of their trip and on day 10 if they’re still in the country. These guidelines are all highlighted in the 79-page document the tourism board released in June.

The document also outlines the requirement of a $100 tourist visa, where visitors will be required to show accommodations, proof of medical insurance, and a return ticket.

Sri Lanka had 2,076 confirmed cases and 11 deaths at the time of writing, per the Johns Hopkins COVID-19 dashboard.

Belize’s international airport will reopen on August 15.

Americans can plan a vacation to Belize when the Philip S. W. Goldson International Airport opens on August 15, the Belize Tourism Board announced.

Travelers can either bring a negative coronavirus test taken within 72 hours of their flight, or they can opt to take a test at the airport. At the airport, travelers will be expected to wear a mask, sanitize their shoes, and go through temperature checks, according to the tourism board.

Visitors will also be required to download the Belize Health App, which will assess health and help the country contact trace.

The country has implemented a tourism certification program and only hotels with a “Tourism Gold Standard Certificate of Recognition” will be allowed to reopen.

According to Johns Hopkins, Belize has 30 confirmed cases and two coronavirus-related deaths at the time of writing.

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